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The wind turbine market has experienced significant growth over the last five years and is expected to continue its growth momentum, reaching approximately US $96 billion by 2016 with a CAGR of 12% over the next five years for annual installations.
 

Concerns over climate change, crude oil prices, and increasing energy demand are generating global interest in renewable resources to meet the world’s energy needs. Wind is a clean, abundant, rapidly growing energy source. The business of generating electricity from wind is set to expand as China, the US, and Rest of the World (ROW) seeks cleaner, more sustainable ways to create electricity. Although wind is more expensive than conventional energy sources, wind turbines have evolved rapidly and decades of research and development have resulted in lower wind energy prices making wind energy competitive with fossil-based fuel energy prices. 
 
Lucintel’s research indicates that the percentage growth rate in cumulative capacity is expected to decrease every year as global cumulative wind capacity increases. This fluctuating growth rate in cumulative capacity brings the total capacity to 568,310 MW by the end of 2016. Asia is expected to remain the leader in wind energy installations. The Chinese and the USA markets are expected to top the list in new turbine installations, with Portugal, France, Italy, the UK, Ireland, and the Netherlands steadily adding capacity.
 
Composites consumption in the wind market is expected to witness a healthy growth over the forecast period and reach US $5.5 billion in 2016. 
 
Lucintel’s research report provides detailed market structure, value chain analysis, and comparative analysis of wind markets, trend scenarios, and forecast statistics for 2011–2016. The report also details the wind market’s drivers and challenges, policies affecting the market, competitive analysis between wind energy with other energy sources, composite materials consumption in the wind energy market, and more. 
 
This unique report from Lucintel provides the valuable information, insights, and tools needed to identify new growth opportunities and operate successfully in this market. Wind energy market report is estimated to save hundreds of hours of your personal research time and it is anticipated to significantly help in expanding your business in this market. In today’s unstable economy, you need every advantage to keep you ahead in your business.
 
To make business, investment, or strategic decisions, you need timely and adequate information. Wind energy market report fulfills this core need and is an indispensable reference guide for multi-national material suppliers, product manufacturers, investors, executives, distributors and many more, who are dealing with the Chinese wind market. 
 
Some of the features of “Growth Opportunities in Wind Energy Markets 2011–2016: Materials, Markets, and Technologies” are-
 
  • Global wind energy market size in terms of value and volume shipment
  • Global battery market trend and forecast in terms of value and volume shipment
  • Regional analysis of global wind market (European market, North America, Asia,  Rest of the World, Costa Rica, Brazil)
  • Competitive analysis: Wind Energy with Other Energy Sources
  • Flow chart for the value chain in the wind energy market major growth drivers and challenges for wind energy 
  • Key materials requirements and suppliers to the wind industry
  • Trend and forecast of battery market by materials, by market and by technologies 
  • Emerging trend for global wind energy market
  • A total over 132 valuable figures/charts and 58  tables are provided in this roughly 320 page report.
 

 1. Executive Summary  

 2. Wind Energy: Past, Present, and Future  
 2.1. History of Wind Energy Use  
 2.2. Quick Facts about Wind Energy  
 2.2.1. What is Wind Energy?  
 2.2.2. What Causes the Wind to Blow?  
 2.2.3. What are Major Components of a Wind Turbine?  
 2.2.4. How big are Wind Turbines?  
 2.2.5. How Much Does a Wind System Cost?  
 2.2.6. What is the Extent of Maintenance Required by Wind Turbines?  
 2.2.7. Are there Good Wind Resources?  
 2.2.8. What are the Advantages of Wind-Generated Electricity?  
 2.2.9. What are the Economic Obstacles to Greater Wind Power Usage?  
 2.2.10. Are there Environmental Problems Faced by Wind Power?  
 2.2.11. Are there Drawbacks to the Use of Wind Energy?  
 2.2.12. Is Wind Energy Good for Economy?  
 2.2.13. Is the Cost of Wind Power Competitive with Conventional Power Plants?  
 2.2.14. Can Homeowners Sell Excess Electricity to the Utility?  
 2.3. Wind Energy … Present  
 2.4. Wind Energy … Future  
 2.5. Types of Wind Turbines  
 2.5.1. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine  
 2.5.2. Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine  

 3. Competitive Analysis between Wind Energy with Other Energy Sources  
 3.1. Total Energy Market  
 3.2. Types of Fossil Fuels  
 3.2.1. Coal  
 3.2.2. Oil  
 3.2.3. Natural Gas  
 3.3. Role of Wind Energy in Total Energy Market  
 3.4. Standards for Wind Energy  
 3.5. Cost Comparison  
 3.5.1. Different Costs of Producing Electricity from the Wind  
 3.5.2. Parameters Affecting the Cost of Electricity  
 3.5.3. Reasons for Costs Coming Down  
 3.5.4. Cost of Pollution  
 3.6. Benefits of Wind Energy  
 3.7. Disadvantages of Wind Energy  

 4. Global Wind Energy Market  
 4.1. Wind Energy- The Future's Energy  
 4.2. Global Market Size for Wind Energy  
 4.3. Global Market Analysis  
 4.4. Regional Analysis  
 4.4.1. The European Market  
 4.4.2. North America  
 4.4.3. Asia  
 4.4.4. Rest of the World  
 4.4.5. Costa Rica  
 4.4.6. Brazil  
 4.5. Market Size for Blades and Towers  

 5. Market Outlook, Forecast, and Growth Rates  
 5.1. Driving Forces  
 5.1.1. Greater Fuel Diversity and Less Dependence on Fossil Fuels  
 5.1.2. Reduced Cost of Electricity Generation  
 5.1.3. Reduced Environmental Impacts  
 5.1.4. More Jobs per Unit of Energy Produced than Other Forms of Energy  
 5.1.5. Electricity Demand  
 5.1.6. Incentives  
 5.2. Challenges  
 5.2.1. Cost of Energy Generation  
 5.2.2. Design of Efficient Rotor Blade  
 5.2.3. Development of Generators that Work at Low Rotational Speeds  
 5.2.4. Wind - Intermittent Source of Power  
 5.2.5. Plant Location  
 5.2.6. Logistics  
 5.2.7. Transmission Issues  
 5.2.8. Permitting Challenges  
 5.3. Market Growth Rates and Trends  
 5.4. Forecast (2011-2016)  
 5.5. Improving Turbine Efficiencies  
 5.5.1. Improved Turbine Efficiencies through Design Innovations  

 6. Turbine Manufacturers and Industry Leaders  
 6.1. Industry Leaders and Market Analysis  
 6.2. Leading Manufacturers for Large Turbine Systems  
 6.2.1. Vestas  
 6.2.2. Sinovel  
 6.2.3. Goldwind  
 6.2.4. Gamesa Eolica  
 6.2.5. ENERCON GmbH  
 6.2.6. GE Wind  
 6.2.7. Suzlon Energy Limited, India  
 6.2.8. Dongfang  
 6.2.9. Siemens  
 6.3. Leading Manufacturers for Small Turbine Systems  
 6.3.1. Southwest Wind Power Inc.  
 6.3.2. Bergey Windpower Co.  
 6.3.3. Synergy Power Corporation  
 6.3.4. Wind Turbine Industries Corp.  
 6.4. Leading Blade Manufacturers  
 6.4.1. LM Wind Power A/S  
 6.4.2. TPI Composites Inc.  
 6.4.3. Molded Fiber Glass  
 6.4.4. Vestas  
 6.4.5. VienTek  
 6.4.6. HT Blade  
 6.4.7. Gamesa  
 6.4.8. CNBM  
 6.5. Tower Manufacturers  
 6.5.1. Aerisyn  
 6.5.2. American Tower Company  
 6.5.3. Ameron International Corporation - WTG  
 6.5.4. Beaird Industries, Inc.  
 6.5.5. COMEQ, Inc.  
 6.5.6. Composite Technology Corporation  
 6.5.7. CWMF, Inc.  
 6.5.8. DMI Industries, Inc  
 6.5.9. Hailo LLC Professional  
 6.5.10. Hitachi America Ltd.  
 6.5.11. Innovative Metal Products  
 6.5.12. Johnson Plate and Tower Fabrication  
 6.5.13. MBI  
 6.5.14. Tower Tech Systems, Inc.  
 6.5.15. Trinity Structural Towers, Inc.  

 7. Composite Materials Consumption in the Wind Energy Market  
 7.1. Driving Forces for the Use of Composite Materials  
 7.1. Raw Materials  
 7.2.1. Reinforcement Types  
 7.2.2. Resin Types  
 7.3. Prepreg Types  
 7.4. Total Composites Consumption  
 7.4.1. Composites Consumption by Components  
 7.4.2. Composites Consumption by Blade/Turbine Manufacturers  
 7.4.3. Composites Consumption by Type of Raw Materials  
 7.4.4. Composites Consumption by Manufacturing Technique  
 7.4.5. Composites Consumption by Region  
 7.5. Forecast (2011-2016) for composites consumption  

 8. Trends in Wind Blade Manufacturing Techniques  
 8.1. The Blade Manufacturing Process  
 8.1.1. Hand Lay-Up/Wet Lay-up Process  
 8.1.2. VARTM Process  
 8.1.3. SCRIMP Process  
 8.1.4. Prepreg Lay-Up Process  
 8.1.5. SPRINT Technology  
 8.2. Process Adoption by the Main Blade Manufacturers  
 8.2.1. Vestas  
 8.2.2. Gamesa  
 8.2.3. LM Wind Power  
 8.3. Technology Trends in Blade Manufacturing  

 9. Raw Materials Used In Blade Manufacturing  
 9.1. Raw Materials Used in the Wind Industry  
 9.1.1. Reinforcement Types  
 9.1.2. Resins and Adhesives Types  
 9.1.3. Core Types  
 9.2. Key Materials Requirements to the Wind Industry  
 9.2.1. Resin Requirements/Issues  
 9.2.2. Prepreg Requirements/Issues  
 9.2.3. Gel Coat Requirements/Issues  
 9.3. Material Suppliers to the Wind Industry  
 9.3.1. Reinforcement Suppliers  
 9.3.2. Prepreg Suppliers  
 9.3.3. Resins and Adhesives Suppliers  
 9.3.4. Core Suppliers  
 9.4. Blade Manufacturers and Materials Used  
 9.4.1. LM Wind Power  
 9.4.2. Nordex  
 9.4.3. Vestas  
 9.4.4. Siemens  
 9.4.4. NEG Micon Rotors  

 10. New Material Demands in Turbine Manufacturing  
 10.1. Cores with Higher Strength to Weight Ratio  
 10.2. Affordable and Stiffer Reinforcements: Carbon Fiber Potential  
 10.2.1. Why Carbon Fiber?  
 10.2.3. Blade Manufacturers and Carbon Fiber Usage  
 10.2.4. Challenges of Using Carbon Fiber  
 10.3. Wider Prepreg/Fabric System  

 11. Structural Components in a Wind Turbine  
 11.1. Tower  
 11.1.1. Tower Manufacturing  
 11.1.2. Cost of a Tower  
 11.2. Nacelle Cover  
 11.3. Hub  
 11.4. Rotor Blades  

 12. Design Aspects of Rotor Blades  
 12.1. Blade Length and Blade Weight  
 12.2. Design of Airfoils for Wind Turbine  
 12.3. Design Aspects of Rotor Blade Root End  

 13. Steps in Wind Turbine Installation  
 13.1. Formation of Foundation  
 13.1.1. Gravity Foundation  
 13.1.2. Gravitation + Steel Foundation  
 13.1.3. Monopile Foundation  
 13.1.4. Tripod Foundation  
 13.2. Installation of Tower  
 13.3. Installation of Nacelle Components  
 13.4. Installation of Hub and Rotor Blades  

 14. New Opportunities in the Wind Energy Market  
 14.1. Emerging trend in global wind energy market  

 List of Figures  
 List of Tables  
 Disclaimer  
 Copyright  
 Abbreviations and technical units  
 About Us  

List of Figures
CHAPTER 1.
Figure 1.1: Porter’s Five Forces model for the wind turbine manufacturer market
CHAPTER 2.
Figure 2.1: Vertical axis wind turbine
Figure 2.2: Downwind machine
CHAPTER 3.
Figure 3.1: Increase in size of power plants, 1911–1980
Figure 3.2: Energy generation in the US for 2010 
Figure 3.3: Comparison on cost of electricity generation using wind, solar, other sources
CHAPTER 4.
Figure 4.1: Growth in cumulative wind capacity installation in global wind energy market 2000–2010
Figure 4.2: Total installed capacity by region at the end of 2010
Figure 4.3: Wind energy market distribution by top five countries by the end of 2010 
Figure 4.4: New turbine installation by region in 2010
Figure 4.5: New turbine installation by major countries in 2010
Figure 4.6: Total installed capacity by region by the end of 2009
Figure 4.7: Cumulative market distribution of wind energy by country, 2009
Figure 4.8: New turbine installation in 2009 by region 
Figure 4.9: New turbine installation in 2009 by country
Figure 4.10: Growth in European wind energy market, 2000–2010
Figure 4.11: Cumulative wind capacity by European countries in 2010
Figure 4.12: Market distribution by new wind capacity installation in Europe in 2010
Figure 4.13: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Germany, 2005–2010
Figure 4.14: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Spain, 2005–2010
Figure 4.15: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Denmark, 2005–2010
Figure 4.16: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in the UK, 2005–2010
Figure 4.17: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Ireland, 2005–2010
Figure 4.18: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in the Netherlands, 2005–2010
Figure 4.19: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Italy, 2005–2010
Figure 4.20: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Sweden, 2005–2010
Figure 4.21: Markets for wind energy in North America in 2010 
Figure 4.22: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in North America, 2000–2010
Figure 4.23: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in the US, 2000–2010
Figure 4.24: Distribution of US installed MW capacity by state, 2010
Figure 4.25: Growth of cumulative wind energy installations in Canada, 2000–2010
Figure 4.26: Wind energy market in Asia by country in 2010
Figure 4.27: Growth of wind energy capacity in India
Figure 4.28: Growth of wind energy market in China
Figure 4.29: Wind energy market in ROW, 2010
Figure 4.30: Blade length for various turbine capacities
Figure 4.31: Wind energy market distribution by turbine capacity
Figure 4.32: Average turbine capacity by year, 2000–2010
CHAPTER 5.
Figure 5.1: Country share of the top five leading wind markets in 2010
Figure 5.2: Percentage growth in cumulative wind capacity by major countries in 2010
Figure 5.3: Trend in global cumulative wind capacity by year 2000–2010
Figure 5.4: Trend in new wind capacity installations 2000–2010
Figure 5.5: Trend in growth in global cumulative wind capacity 2000–2010 
Figure 5.6: Trend in the global wind energy equipment market value 2005–2010
($ billion)
Figure 5.7: Trend in average turbine capacity (MW) installed 2000–2010 
Figure 5.8: Trend in new wind turbine installations 2000–2010
Figure 5.9: Expected progress of average and maximum blade lengths in meters
Figure 5.10: Trend in average turbine blade weight 2000–2010
Figure 5.11: Global market forecast in cumulative MW wind energy capacity 2011–2016
Figure 5.12: Forecast for new installations worldwide 2011–2016
Figure 5.13: Cumulative wind energy capacity forecast by region 2011–2016
Figure 5.14: Forecast of average turbine capacities 2011–2016
Figure 5.15: Forecast for new turbine installations 2011–2016  
Figure 5.16: Forecast for wind blades installed 2011–2016
Figure 5.17: Forecast for average blade weight in pounds 2011–2016
Figure 5.18: Forecast for global wind energy market value ($ billion) 2011–2016
Figure 5.19: Evolution of wind turbine technology to meet evolving demands
Figure 5.20: Current trends, future technology, and future materials for turbine components
CHAPTER 6.
Figure 6.1: Market distribution by MW installed in 2005
Figure 6.2: Market distribution by MW installed in 2010
Figure 6.3: MW of wind capacity installed by turbine manufacturers in 2010
Figure 6.4: Market share of top five turbine manufacturers in 2010
CHAPTER 7.
Figure 7.1: Comparing density and Young’s modulus for reinforcement materials
Figure 7.2: Tensile elongation (% change) for polyester, vinyl ester, and epoxy resins
Figure 7.3: Comparing tensile strength of resins at different cure temperatures and times
Figure 7.4: Price/performance comparison for resins
Figure 7.5: Annual composite materials consumption (million pounds) in the wind energy market
Figure 7.6: Trend in market value of composites consumption in wind energy market
Figure 7.7: Typical composite materials distribution by turbine components
Figure 7.8: Volume of composite materials consumption by turbine components, 2010
Figure 7.9: Composites shipment distribution (%) by blade/turbine manufacturer, 2010
Figure 7.10: Composites shipments (million pounds) by wind blade manufacturers, 2010
Figure 7.11: Composite materials consumption (%) by type of raw materials used in 2010
Figure 7.12: Composite materials consumption (million pounds) by type of raw materials used in the wind market, 2010
Figure 7.13: Composite shipments ($ million) by type of raw materials used in 2010
Figure 7.14: Percentage composites consumption by blade manufacturing technique, 2010 
Figure 7.15: Composite shipments (million pounds) by manufacturing techniques in 2010
Figure 7.16: Recent trends in distribution of wind energy market composites use by blade manufacturing process
Figure 7.17: Composites shipment distribution by region in 2010 
Figure 7.18: Composites consumption in Europe, North America, and Asia in 2010
Figure 7.19: Forecast for composites consumption (million pounds) in global wind energy market, 2011–2016
Figure 7.20: Forecast for composites consumption ($ million) in global wind energy market, 2011–2016
Figure 7.21: Forecast for composites consumption by type of materials in 2016
Figure 7.22: Forecast for composites shipments (million pounds) by regions in 2016
Figure 7.23: Forecast for composites shipments (million pounds) by turbine components in 2016
CHAPTER 8
Figure 8.1: Blade shapes showing complex airfoil construction
Figure 8.2: Turbine blades
Figure 8.3: Technicians finishing the mold for making blades
Figure 8.4: Workers finishing the blade surface
Figure 8.5: Demonstration of blade manufacturing
Figure 8.6: Process flow in rotor blade manufacturing 
Figure 8.7: Rotor blade market (million pounds) by manufacturing techniques in 2010
Figure 8.8: Material flow chart for the wet hand lay-up process
Figure 8.9: Material flow chart for the VARTM process
Figure 8.10: Material flow chart for the prepreg lay-up process 
Figure 8.11: Wind blade manufacturing plant
Figure 8.12: Blade manufacturers’ market share in 2010
Figure 8.13: Expected progression of average and maximum blade lengths in meters
Figure 8.14: Progression of rotor dimensions with increase in MW capacity
Figure 8.15: Blade material evolution trends with trend in blade technology 
Figure 8.16: Trends in wind blade manufacturing process 
Figure 8.17: Innovations in wind blade manufacturing
Figure 8.18: Blade production using first generation of robotics in the form of laser-guided and automatic glass lay-up
CHAPTER 9.
Figure 9.1: Summary of composites materials used in the wind market
Figure 9.2: Strength comparison of unidirectional E-glass system
Figure 9.3: Strength comparison of unidirectional carbon fiber system
Figure 9.4: Compressive property comparison for various types of core materials (average 6 lb/ft3 density)
Figure 9.5: Shear strength comparison of various types of core materials (6 lb/ft3)
Figure 9.6: Composite materials consumption by type of raw materials used in 2010
Figure 9.7: Volume shipments of composite materials in the wind market in 2010
CHAPTER 10.
Figure 10.1: Evolution in the demand for new materials in blade manufacturing
Figure 10.2: All carbon composite blades for 900-watt wind turbines
CHAPTER 11.
Figure 11.1: Major structural components of a wind turbine
Figure 11.2: Turbine components in a wind turbine
Figure 11.3: Tower manufacturing
Figure 11.4: Blade design where blade surfaces work as structural shells
Figure 11.5: Blade design with rectangular spar
CHAPTER 12.
Figure 12.1: Standard blade lengths for various turbine capacities
Figure 12.2: Effect of blade length on the weight of a blade 
Figure 12.3: Blade design with rectangular spar 
Figure 12.4: Blade design where blade surfaces work as structural shells
CHAPTER 13.
Figure 13.1: Four key steps in installing a wind turbine
Figure 13.2: Formation of foundation
Figure 13.3: Tower installation
Figure 13.4: Nacelle installation
Figure 13.5: Hub and rotor blade installation
CHAPTER 14.
Figure 14.1: Emerging trends in the global wind energy market
CHAPTER 15.
Figure 15.1: Flow chart for the value chain in the wind energy market
Figure 15.2: Composite materials consumption (million pounds) by type of raw materials used in the wind market in 2010
Figure 15.3: Composites shipments ($ million) by type of raw materials used in 2010
Figure 15.4: Turbine manufacturing, material value, and value addition through various nodes of the value chain (raw material to end product) in 2010
Figure 15.5: 2010 revenue ($) flow chart through various manufacturing processes
List of Tables
Table 1.1: Market parameters for global wind energy market and attributes of usage
Table 1.2: Market parameters for composite materials usage in global wind energy market
Table 2.1: Typical turbine parameters
Table 2.2: Turbine facts of a Vestas 3 MW Turbine installed in 2010
Table 2.3: Turbine parameter of a 7.5 MW turbine manufactured by ENERCON
Table 3.1: Energy data for 2010 for the US
Table 3.2: Average power plant sizes between 1980 and 2000
Table 4.1: Worldwide wind energy capacities (cumulative) from 1980 to 1990
Table 4.2: Worldwide wind energy capacities (cumulative) from 1990 to 2010
Table 4.3: Wind energy capacities by Top 20 countries at the end of 2009 and 2010
Table 4.4: Ranking of countries in terms of cumulative wind capacity 2006 to 2008
Table 4.5: Growth of wind energy in Europe (MW)
Table 4.6: Ranking of countries in Europe in terms of cumulative wind capacity
Table 4.7: Growth of wind energy in Germany (MW)
Table 4.8: Growth of wind energy in Spain (MW)
Table 4.9: Growth of wind energy in Denmark (MW)
Table 4.10: Growth of wind energy in the United Kingdom (MW)
Table 4.11: Growth of wind energy in Ireland (MW)
Table 4.12: Growth of wind energy in the Netherlands (MW)
Table 4.13: Growth of wind energy in Italy (MW)
Table 4.14: Growth of wind energy in Sweden (MW)
Table 4.15: Growth of wind energy in the US (MW)
Table 4.16: US wind turbine growth
Table 4.17: New turbines (MW) installed by turbine manufacturers in 2010
Table 4.18: Turbine supplier market share by number of turbines installed in 2010, for the US market
Table 4.19: Canadian wind market capacity 2007–2010
Table 4.20: Major wind farms in Canada 
Table 4.21: Growth of wind energy in India 2007–2010
Table 4.22: Growth of wind energy in China 2007–2010
Table 4.23: Weight of turbine components for various standard Vestas turbines
Table 4.24: Cost breakdown for initial capital investment in a 1.5 MW wind turbine
Table 5.1: Growth rates in worldwide cumulative wind energy capacities, 1990 to 2010
Table 5.2: Comparing average wind capacity growth rates in over different historical periods
Table 5.3: Trend in growth in cumulative wind capacity, annual installation for the top wind-producing countries 
Table 5.4: Percentage growth in new MW installation 2000–2010
Table 5.5: Growth forecast for new capacity and cumulative capacity 2011–2016
Table 5.6: Wind energy market forecast by region 2011–2016
Table 6.1: Industry leaders and their market share in 2009 and 2010
Table 6.2: Summary of Synergy turbines
Table 6.3: Summary of Jacobs wind turbines
Table 6.4: Summary of LM rotor blades
Table 7.1: Comparison of mechanical properties for various reinforcements
Table 7.2: Summary of advantages and disadvantages of polyester, vinyl ester and epoxy resins
Table 7.3: Comparison of mechanical properties for polyester, vinyl ester, and epoxy resins
Table 7.4: Typical epoxy resin properties for rotor blades
Table 7.5: Summary of raw materials used by turbine/blade manufacturers
Table 7.6: Summary of manufacturing techniques used by blade manufacturers
Table 8.1: Summary of manufacturing techniques used by blade manufacturers
Table 8.2: Comparison of advantages and disadvantages in hand lay-up, infusion, and prepreg processes
Table 9.1: Properties of fibers and conventional bulk materials
Table 9.2: Typical epoxy resin properties for rotor blades
Table 9.3: Comparative data for balsa and PVC core materials
Table 9.4: Summary of raw materials used by turbine/blade manufacturers
Table 10.1: Changes in turbine parameters for turbines in 2008 and 2010
Table 10.2: Blade parameters for a carbon blade (ATV 25)
Table 10.3: List of turbine and blade manufacturers using carbon fiber
Table 11.1: Weights of turbine components for various Vestas turbines
Table 14.1: Weights of turbine components for various Vestas standard turbines
.

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More than 132 valuable figures/charts and 58 tables are provided in this roughly 320 page report
 
Lucintel has been in the business of market research and management consulting since 2000 and has published over 600 market intelligence reports in various markets / applications and served 1,000+ clients worldwide. This study is a culmination of four months of full-time effort performed by Lucintel's analyst team. The analysts used the following sources for the creation and completion of this valuable report:
  • In-depth interviews of the major players in this market
  • Detailed secondary research from competitors’ financial statements and published data
  • Extensive search of published works, market and database information with industry news, company press releases, and customer intentions
  • A compilation of the experiences, judgments, and insights of Lucintel’s professionals, who have analyzed and tracked this market over the years.
Extensive research and interviews are conducted in the supply chain of this market to estimate market share, market size, trends, drivers, challenges and forecasts in the market. Below is a brief summary of primary interviews conducted by both job function and region.


Thus, Lucintel compiles vast amounts of data from numerous sources, validates the integrity of that data, and performs a comprehensive analysis on it. Lucintel then organizes the data, its findings, and insights into a concise report designed to support the strategic decision-making process. The figure below is a graphical representation of the Lucintel research process.

 

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